2021: The Year of the Great Reset to Begin to Build Back Better

Happy 2021!  This new year could not come soon enough. As you read this, it is clear that globally we are at a crossroads and that the inequities we see at home are also reflected across the broader planet.  The pandemic has instigated a moment to re-examine our relationship with nature and the planet’s resources.

Increasingly, world leaders (even conservatives) see this as a time to push the “reset” button to create societies that see conservation and the natural world as essential to our rebuilding after the pandemic and to mitigate and prepare for climate changes that are ahead.  Globally there is a growing alignment around #TheGreatReset, that major global institutions — the United Nations, the World Economic Forum, the International Monetary Fund, the world’s largest banks and investors, and the most prosperous and stable nations — are leading.

Most of the world is moving ahead on this reset — they see conserving nature and economic development as consistent. Indeed, the annual global Environmental Performance Index published by Yale shows that governments and policies make a big difference. Denmark is #1 again this year because of a bold climate agenda to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 70% by 2030.  The U.S. is #24 and falling — already behind most western nations, the authors of the report point out.  

Last June, on World Environment Day, the World Economic Forum held a panel discussion in which they rolled out their initiative called #TheGreatReset, which will culminate in a virtual summit later this month connecting key global governmental and business leaders with a global multistakeholder network in 400 cities around the world for a forward-oriented dialogue driven by the younger generation.  These are their principles:

  • “‘The Great Reset’ is a commitment to jointly and urgently build the foundations of our economic and social system for a more fair, sustainable, and resilient future.
  • It requires a new social contract centered on human dignity, social justice, and where societal progress does not fall behind economic development.
  • The global health crisis has laid bare longstanding ruptures in our economies and societies, and created a social crisis that urgently requires decent, meaningful jobs.”

The authors of the Global Environmental Performance Index found four “striking” conclusions after studying the data used to create the 2020 EPI rankings.

  • First, good policy results are associated with wealth (GDP per capita), meaning that economic prosperity makes it possible for nations to invest in policies and programs that lead to desirable outcomes.”
  • Second, the pursuit of economic prosperity – manifested in industrialization and urbanization – often means more pollution and other strains on ecosystem vitality, especially in the developing world, where air and water emissions remain significant. But at the same time, the data suggest countries need not sacrifice sustainability for economic security or vice versa.”
  • Third, while top EPI performers pay attention to all areas of sustainability, their lagging peers tend to have uneven performance. Denmark, which ranks #1, has strong results across most issues and with leading-edge commitments and outcomes with regard to climate change mitigation. In general, high scorers exhibit long-standing policies and programs to protect public health, preserve natural resources, and decrease greenhouse gas emissions.”
  • Fourth, laggards must redouble national sustainability efforts along all fronts.

Let’s get started!  There is no time to waste!  Here’s to better days in 2021!

For More Inspiration: Watch the version of #TheGreatReset video from the Prince of Wales.

Up Next

Diamonds No Longer In the Rough: Pandora Announces Transition to Lab-Made Diamonds 

Diamonds No Longer In the Rough: Pandora Announces Transition to Lab-Made Diamonds 

The largest jewelry company in the world, Pandora, announced that it will no longer use mined diamonds in its wares. Instead, the company opted to use lab-created diamonds, that have the same “optical, chemical, thermal and physical characteristics.” The collection, Pandora Brilliance, is the company’s first created only with diamonds manufactured in labs. 

Why this Matters:  These lab-made diamonds are made more sustainably than their mined counterparts. 

Continue Reading 496 words
One Shareholder Uprising Thing: Dupont Loses Big Vote on Plastic Pollution

One Shareholder Uprising Thing: Dupont Loses Big Vote on Plastic Pollution

It’s annual meeting season, and corporations are increasingly on the defensive about their carbon footprint, climate change policies, and other social issues.  Most of the time, corporate leaders manage to fend off such resolutions.  But this year, DuPont lost big on a shareholder proposal, filed by a group called As You Sow, that received 81.2 […]

Continue Reading 182 words
Vaccine Trash Is Overwhelming the World’s Waste-Management Systems

Vaccine Trash Is Overwhelming the World’s Waste-Management Systems

by Amy Lupica, ODP Staff Writer Single-use plastics are being taxed and phased out across the country, but what do we do about the single-use items we can’t avoid? This is the conundrum facing the country as the vaccine rollout continues and accelerates. With over 230 million doses administered before President Biden’s 100th day in office, millions of plastic syringes […]

Continue Reading 484 words

Want the planet in your inbox?

Subscribe to the email that top lawmakers, renowned scientists, and thousands of concerned citizens turn to each morning for the latest environmental news and analysis.