Meeting Paris Goals Will Create Green Jobs

Researchers recently conducted an analysis of how trying to meet the Paris Agreement targets would affect energy jobs in 50 countries. They found that action to reach the targets would increase net jobs by about 8 million by 2050, primarily due to gains in the solar and wind industries. 

Why This Matters: An estimated 18 million people work in the global energy industry including in fossil fuel extraction, refining, as well as in renewable energy industries.

  • Reaching Paris Agreement goals by 2050 would increase that total by nearly 50% to 26 million.

The analysis shows that fossil fuel jobs will decline but can be offset by those associated with cleaner forms of energy. 

This is especially important as the U.S. energy sector lost 10% of its workforce last year as a result of the COVID pandemic, with the bulk of the losses being felt in the fossil fuel sector. The Biden administration’s clean energy goals will be key to restoring these losses while helping the United States get on a path to meet Paris goals.

The Study: The study was conducted by a team led by Johannes Emmerling, an environmental economist at the RFF-CMCC European Institute on Economics and the Environment in Italy, and is the first based on a comprehensive dataset of over 50 countries, including major fossil fuel producing economies.

  • The team combined this dataset with a model to make job projections.
  • The model helps see how the development of humans and the choices societies make affect each other.
  • Almost all previous analyses relied on jobs data for OECD countries and generalized the results for the rest of the world using a multiplier.

A Just Transition: Dr. Sandeep Pai, who led the analysis as part of his Ph.D. at the institute for resources, environment and sustainability at the University of British Columbia in Canada, explained that there will undoubtedly be winners and losers in the transition to greener energy.

The winners will be people who take these jobs in the renewable sector, and there are the health benefits of fresh air and cleaner cities – but there will also be people, companies and governments who lose out.” Pai told The Guardian.

This is why it’s crucial to ensure a just transition to a clean energy future for all workers. This will also be important in helping the politics to align and make a path to meeting Paris goals feasible.

Up Next

Three-Fourths of the Worlds Planned Coal Projects Scrapped Since 2015

Three-Fourths of the Worlds Planned Coal Projects Scrapped Since 2015

By Amy Lupica, ODP Daily Editor A new report has found that since the 2015 signing of the Paris agreement, more than 75% of the world’s planned coal plant projects have been scrapped, and 44 countries have no future coal plans whatsoever. The report’s authors hope this trend will continue as the COP26 conference in […]

Continue Reading 475 words
House Ways and Means Committee Unveils Clean Energy Tax Credits

House Ways and Means Committee Unveils Clean Energy Tax Credits

By Amy Lupica, ODP Daily Editor The House Ways and Means Committee has released their portion of the reconciliation for the Democrats’ $3.5 trillion spending package. The plan follows through on many promises made by the Biden administration, including clean energy tax credits and credits for electric vehicle owners. The plan, announced on the heels […]

Continue Reading 365 words
Federal Government to Revise Leasing Rules for Wind and Solar on Public Lands

Federal Government to Revise Leasing Rules for Wind and Solar on Public Lands

By Amy Lupica, ODP Daily Editor   On Tuesday, the Biden administration announced that it would “revise” regulations regarding renewable energy on public lands, a move that may ease the development of solar and wind projects. The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) said that it would be seeking input for a new proposal, which it plans to issue early next year. […]

Continue Reading 416 words

Want the planet in your inbox?

Subscribe to the email that top lawmakers, renowned scientists, and thousands of concerned citizens turn to each morning for the latest environmental news and analysis.