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Tornados are survivable yet Americans are still dying

Tornados are survivable yet Americans are still dying

Tornado warning technology has improved significantly in the past decades yet in states like Alabama, tornadoes still routinely claim human lives when they don’t have to. Just last week more than three dozen tornadoes wrought havoc in the Deep South, killing 23 and razing the ground bare in many areas and just yesterday two tornadoes […]

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America’s leaky septic systems a big problem

America’s leaky septic systems a big problem

As many as 1 in 5 Americans rely on a septic system to treat their wastewater, yet as our population grows, these systems are having unintended consequences that are endangering human and environmental health. In many places like Alabama Black Belt’s Lowndes County, septic systems can cost upwards of $30,000 and thus many low-income residents […]

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Federal disaster recovery dollars increase inequality and favor white families

Federal disaster recovery dollars increase inequality and favor white families


An NPR investigation released this week has revealed that across the country, white Americans and those with more wealth often receive more federal dollars after a disaster than do minorities and those with less wealth. While natural disasters are becoming more common in America as a result of climate change( in the early and mid-20th century, […]

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U.S. to FINALLY get volcano early warning system

U.S. to FINALLY get volcano early warning system

As the Sierra Club explained, on Tuesday, the House of Representatives passed the Natural Resources Management Act, a lands conservation bill that combines more than 100 pieces of legislation protecting 3-million-plus acres of land. The bill, which the Senate overwhelmingly passed two weeks ago, also classifies hundreds of miles of US rivers as wild, scenic, […]

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Protecting the Grand Canyon from mining on its 100th anniversary

Protecting the Grand Canyon from mining on its 100th anniversary

Yesterday Grand Canyon National Park celebrated its 100th birthday. Fortune explained it best: “on Feb. 26, 1919, Congress passed legislation backed by President Woodrow Wilson recognizing the canyon as a national park. The natural wonder has become an American symbol and a space for visitors to connect with the raw outdoors. The scenic landscape holds […]

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Hipsters fueling illicit cactus trade

Hipsters fueling illicit cactus trade

Cacti and succulents have rapidly grown in popularity in the past few years and it turns out that the insatiable demand to have the trendy plants adorn homes is driving poachers to dig them up from the wild and increasingly on public lands. The Guardian recently reported in its in-depth piece that “in the US […]

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One cool thing: 9 pioneering African American outdoorspeople

One cool thing: 9 pioneering African American outdoorspeople

Check out Sierra Club’s recent profile of 9 pioneering African American outdoorspeople. We highly recommend that you read the entire profile of the following trailblazers and explorers

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FDR’s New Deal Was Green

FDR’s New Deal Was Green

As we contemplate the sweeping Green New Deal resolution recently introduced, which promises that “public lands, waters, and oceans are protected” and that all Americans have “access to nature,” we should look back at the very green legacy of  FDR’s New Deal.  As part of historic first 100 days legislation, Roosevelt proposed the Emergency Conservation Work (EWC) Act, more commonly known as the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) to put to work unemployed young men in a peacetime “army” and “send them into battle” against destruction and erosion of our country’s natural resources. 

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Court OKs Border Wall Environmental Waiver

Court OKs Border Wall Environmental Waiver

The usually liberal federal appeals court in California sides with President Trump on Monday, ruling that the government has wide latitude to waive environmental laws to build a segment of the border wall in order to put on a speed construction of some border construction projects in southern California.  According to NPR, the court let stand a Department of Homeland Security decision to bypass environmental regulations — including the National Environmental Policy Act, Clean Air Act, and Endangered Species Act — to quickly construct barriers and roads near the U.S.-Mexico border.

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Protests Against Drilling in ANWR Dominate Public Meeting

Protests Against Drilling in ANWR Dominate Public Meeting

Last week, the Interior Department held a public meeting in Fairbanks to hear their comments and concerns about plans to open the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to oil and gas drilling.  The agency brought scientists who were there to explain the environmental impact of the project and then take testimony from members of the public. 

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One Bubbly Problem: Soil Erosion in Italy

One Bubbly Problem: Soil Erosion in Italy

Italy is known for its delicious Prosecco – a sparkling wine from Italy that is similar to champagne.  As its popularity expands, so does the “footprint” of this wine — and a new study says it is unsustainable at its current rate of growth.  The Washington Post reports that increasing demand for the prosecco seems […]

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National Parks Picking Up

National Parks Picking Up

With the shutdown over, for employees of our country’s National Parks, the tough clean up job is just getting started.  Sadly the toll of the shutdown on our natural heritage may have been greater than feared in some locations.  For example, Joshua Tree National Park suffered damage from vandalism that will be irreparable for the next 200 to 300 years, according to former park superintendent Curt Sauer.  The Trump Administration kept many parks open for most or all of the shutdown, but volunteers who helped clean up trash and service bathrooms in popular parks like Joshua Tree could not keep up with routine maintenance, much less stop the vandals.  

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