Water
Salty runoff creating “chemical cocktails” in drinking water

Salty runoff creating “chemical cocktails” in drinking water

Last Week we wrote about the detriment that road salt can have on waterways, plants, and animals and how runoff is causing dead zones in lakes. It turns out that the story doesn’t stop there and all that salt is actually reacting with soil and water pipes to form toxic substances that can poison drinking water and harm the environment. The Revelator recently published an article examining a report published last month that found that not only is salinity increasing in many surface waters, but when you add salt to the environment it can mobilize heavy metals, nutrient pollution and other contaminants that are combining to create new “chemical cocktails” in rivers, streams, and reservoirs.

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Buried Antarctic lake reveals water bears and clues to previous warming

Buried Antarctic lake reveals water bears and clues to previous warming

Lake Mercer is a subglacial lake deep below the Antarctic Ice and it’s sat untouched by humans for millennia– until now. As  Nature News & Comment reported scientists drilling into a buried Antarctic lake 600 kilometers from the South Pole have found surprising signs of ancient life: the carcasses of tiny animals preserved under a kilometer of ice.

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U.S. Farms Poisoning Drinking Water Supplies

U.S. Farms Poisoning Drinking Water Supplies

The Wall Street Journal published a stinging critique of big agriculture’s impact on rural drinking water supplies, which they say are being spoiled “by fewer, more-intensively worked farms, bigger cows and shifting crop mixes.”  As a result, these large farms are more productive than ever, but as a result, the percentage of U.S. drinking water with nitrates concentrations above safe levels is rising.

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One Funny Thing: a carousel for ducks


Honestly the best part of this ice disk are the ducks taking a ride on it 😂❤️🦆 pic.twitter.com/0Lz9qlUHaW — Taylor Gleason (@TaylorGWGME) January 15, 2019 Freezing temperatures have brought ice as well as a surprising new feature to the town of Westbrook, Maine, according to the New Scientist. An enormous circle of ice has formed […]

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Groundwater Supplies Are Depleted And at Risk From Fracking

Groundwater Supplies Are Depleted And at Risk From Fracking

The Revelator, a publication of the Center for Biological Diversity, reported on a new study that found that “fresh” groundwater is 50% less plentiful in several key U.S. regions than scientists previously believed.  Therefore, digging deeper to find groundwater that is drinkable (not too salty or contaminated) is an increasingly infeasible answer to water shortages across the country.

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More snow, more salt, more problems

More snow, more salt, more problems

Just as one storm passed last weekend, here in D.C. (as well as across central and eastern parts of the country) we’re expected to get more winter weather. As USA Today reported, a pair of winter storms will dump snow and ice across the central and eastern U.S. over the next several days, with the second storm a potential blockbuster in some spots, with a foot of snow possible. However, with snow comes road salt to help it melt and prevent ice from forming. The downside of melting snow with rock salt is that when the snow melts most of that salt makes its way into waterways where it can harm aquatic species should enough of it accumulate. As CNN explained, salt can also change the way the water mixes and lead to the formation of salty pockets near the bottom of lakes, creating biological dead zones.

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