Harvard to Phase Out Fossil Fuel Investments


Image: David Adam Kess via Wikimedia Commons

By Natasha Lasky, ODP Staff Writer

In a recent missive, Harvard University announced that it aims to avoid new investments in fossil fuels. In the past, Harvard has resisted taking environmental concerns into account when investing its $42 billion endowment. But the university’s president, Lawrence S. Bacow, emphasized in an email, “climate change is the most consequential threat facing humanity.”

 

Why this Matters: University endowments are not taxed, so many feel that they should be used to contribute to the public good. Some of these endowments — like Harvard’s — are large enough to be forces for change. Harvard has joined Oxford, Cambridge, Brown, and Cornell, in making a commitment to divest from fossil fuels. This decision could encourage other universities to divest as well.

 

“People do pay attention to what Harvard does,” said Danielle Strasburger, the co-founder of Harvard Forward, an alumni divestment movement, to the New York Times.

 

Activism Prevails

In a recent election for the Harvard Board of Overseers, the group Harvard Forward succeeded in campaigning for four pro-divestment candidates, which helped move the university towards this decision.

 

President Bacow also emphasized that the Harvard Management Company (HMC), which manages the university’s endowment and investments, has already been phasing out fossil fuels: “HMC has no direct investments in companies that explore for or develop further reserves of fossil fuels. Moreover, HMC does not intend to make such investments in the future.”

 

Bacow also said that fossil fuel investments are not “prudent,” suggesting there were also financial incentives for divestment. According to the New York Times, “the HMC has some legacy investments, as a limited partner in a number of private equity firms with holdings in the fossil fuel industry, amounting to less than 2% of the endowment.” The university plans to “build a portfolio of investments in funds that support the transition to a green economy.”

Up Next

Australia Finally Releases Pathway to Net Zero By 2050, Leaving Many Wanting More

Australia Finally Releases Pathway to Net Zero By 2050, Leaving Many Wanting More

By Amy Lupica, ODP Daily Editor With less than one week left until COP26, Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison has moved his government to the left on climate change, committing for the first time to a net zero target by 2050, but questions remain about the details and many remain frustrated by Morrison’s refusal to […]

Continue Reading 518 words
Atmospheric Carbon Levels Reach 3 Million Year Highs Ahead of COP26

Atmospheric Carbon Levels Reach 3 Million Year Highs Ahead of COP26

By Amy Lupica, ODP Daily Editor Atmospheric carbon dioxide levels have hit a three-million-year high, according to a World Meteorological Organization (WMO) report published yesterday. Despite a brief dip in emissions in 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the overall trend of increasing emissions continues, indicating last year’s dip had little to no impact on […]

Continue Reading 313 words
Global Leaders and Scientists on the Economic Cost of Biodiversity Loss

Global Leaders and Scientists on the Economic Cost of Biodiversity Loss

By Natasha Lasky, ODP Staff Writer A report in the Dasgupta Review shows that by using a fiscal lens to view Earth’s growing biodiversity loss, we can see how it links to economic development. By viewing nature as an asset like “produced capital (roads, buildings and factories)” or “human capital (health, knowledge and skills)” — […]

Continue Reading 376 words

Want the planet in your inbox?

Subscribe to the email that top lawmakers, renowned scientists, and thousands of concerned citizens turn to each morning for the latest environmental news and analysis.