Hero of the Week: The Stagg Tree

Image: Max Forster, Save the Redwoods League

We know, usually, our Heroes of the Week are humans but hear us out: trees are serious climate heroes.

Fun fact: Giant sequoia forests and the related coast redwood forests store more carbon per acre than any other forest on Earth.

Our hero this week is the Stagg Tree which is a giant sequoia tree located in California’s 530-acre Alder Creek forest–and it needs your help! Last month Save the Redwoods League announced an opportunity to purchase Alder Creek, the largest remaining privately owned giant sequoia property in the world.

The acquisition cost of the Alder Creek property is $15.65 million, which must be raised by December 31, 2019. If you’re able to, please support the protection and restoration of Alder Creek and its ancient trees (donations can be made here).

If you don’t live in California, why should you care about giant sequoias? We asked Save the Redwoods League’s president and CEO Sam Hodder to break it down:

Giant sequoia are the largest trees on Earth, taller than a 30-story building and wider than a two-lane street, and they only grow in 73 scattered groves on the western slopes of California’s Sierra Nevada. The protection of California’s big trees inspired America’s conservation movement when President Lincoln protected Yosemite Valley and the Mariposa Grove of Giant Sequoias during the Civil War in 1864.

Today, Save the Redwoods League and our supporters have the most consequential giant sequoia conservation opportunity our lifetimes….If we are successful, then by the end of this year, more than 98 percent of giant sequoia will be protected for our future.

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