Heroes of the Week: The People Left Cleaning Up

Image: Southern Hills Hospital

Throughout the coronavirus crisis, there have been countless heroes who have emerged to take care of the sick, protect the healthy, and ensure that our society functions as best as it can in extraordinary times. But some of our lesser-acknowledged heroes are the people who are cleaning up our waste and sanitizing our hospitals and facilities.

Environmental service crews, sanitation workers, and people working at medical waste facilities risk their health every day to ensure that hospitals are disinfected and our trash is disposed of.

COVID-19 has necessitated the increased use of disposable items such as gloves, masks, as well as food containers and shopping bags, some of which are putting people and animals at risk. These items are piling up at exponential rates and the workers tasked with cleaning them up are working overtime and don’t always feel adequately protected. Some are even taking the time to bring cheer to their communities. We’d like to honor these men and women and express our gratitude for their tireless work. They deserve protection and a pay raise.

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