Listen To This: Reaching Back to the New Deal for the American Jobs Plan’s Climate Corps

National Public Radio (NPR) did a terrific story on the climate corps to provide jobs for young people that the administration proposed in the American Jobs Plan.  The proposal provides for $10 billion to launch “The Civilian Climate Corps,” to address the threat of climate change by strengthening protections on public lands.   The comparisons to President Franklin Roosevelt and his Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) are apt.  During its nine-year tenure, according to NPR, the CCC  did many of the same things the Climate Corps would do — they fought wildfires and helped in relief efforts after disasters like floods and hurricanes, as well as building 100,000 miles of roads and trails, 318,000 dams and tens of thousands of bridges. It also ran telephone lines across the country.  Sound familiar?

Why This Matters:  Journalist Jonathan Alter commented to NPR that “we’ve been living in the shadow of Reagan’s America. And now it’s back to the future. We’re going to start to live in the shadow of FDR.”  NPR noted that CCC projects remain popular today even with Republicans. But in one respect the Climate Corps would be markedly different — the jobs are intended for a very diverse group of people in both rural and urban areas.

To hear the story, click here.  And I recommend you take a look at the story as well.

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