New Film “Dark Waters” Based On True Story of DuPont Toxic Pollution

Attorney Rob Bilott the real-life attorney from the movie Dark Waters.    Photo: Bryan Schutmaat for The New York Times

A new environmental thriller called “Dark Waters” that opens in theaters later this week is already getting great reviews.  It is the passion project of its star, Mark Ruffalo, who wanted to make a film adaptation of a 2016 New York Times Magazine article by writer Nathaniel Rich entitled, “The Lawyer Who Became DuPont’s Worst Nightmare.” The article tells the story of attorney Rob Billot who, after working for years as a lawyer defending corporations, fought to expose that DuPont knew about the dangers of the toxic pollutant PFOA for decades.  According to NPR, DuPont and its spinoff company Chemours agreed to settle a lawsuit in 2017 for $671 million to the impacted community.

We are attending a pre-screening tonight and we will give our own review tomorrow. It is interesting that although Dupont disputes the movie’s account, it plans no counter-offensive in the media. “Unfortunately, in a situation like this, it just doesn’t do you much good to fight it out in the public eye. That would just drive more and more attention to it,” DuPont CEO Mark Doyle told NPR.   Telling.

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