New York To Bid Foie Gras Adieu

A foie gras producer in upstate New York       Photo: Bebeto Matthews, AP

The New York City Council voted overwhelmingly to ban the French delicacy foie gras from being sold in restaurants, stores, and farmer’s markets because it is made by force-feeding ducks and geese to fatten up their livers in a way that some consider the “most inhumane process in the commercial food industry,” according to The New York Times.  The ban goes into effect in 3 years and will impact about 1000 restaurants, as well as some farmers in upstate New York who sell foie gras to restaurants in the City.  New York City joins California in banning foie gras — for animal rights activists it was a key “battleground” where demand for the luxury food was fueled by the “expense account lunch.”   Some chefs were insensed — “What’s next? No more veal?”  Sacré Bleu!

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