One Climate SOS Thing: Floating A House Down the River Thames

The Extinction Rebellion launched another high profile protest, this time floating down the River Thames in London a “model” of a suburban home that is literally partially under water as a way to raise awareness about rising sea levels that will leave many homes under water.  The group said that, “[w]e are watching, in real-time, as people’s lives are destroyed around the world and in the UK. Unless action is taken to halt biodiversity loss and reduce greenhouse gas emissions to net-zero these tragedies are set to worsen.”  Berlin also saw a major climate protest on Sunday, as a group of activists many of whom were dressed as penguins called for a stop to all domestic and short-haul flights, arguing that they are disproportionately responsible for CO2 emissions and other gases blamed on global warming.  Got our attention! Mission accomplished.

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G7 Countries Promise to Stop Financing Coal — Don’t Set Date to Stop Burning It

G7 Countries Promise to Stop Financing Coal — Don’t Set Date to Stop Burning It

by Ashira Morris, ODP Staff Writer World leaders from the Group of 7 countries wrapped up their first post-pandemic in-person summit on Sunday, and the climate crisis was one of the primary agenda items. The heads of state from the U.S., U.K., France, Germany, Canada, Italy, and Japan (as well as the European Union) Agreed […]

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“Megadrought” Takes Lake Mead to an All-Time Low

“Megadrought” Takes Lake Mead to an All-Time Low

The nation’s largest reservoir, Lake Mead, created by the Hoover Dam on the Colorado River, has reached record lows (at only 36% full) in the face of a severe drought sweeping the western U.S. The reservoir supplies drinking water for 25 million people in Los Angeles, San Diego, Phoenix, Tucson, Las Vegas, and more.

Why This Matters: Drought is becoming a permanent fixture across the west, and dry conditions are moving further east each year. 

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Melting Permafrost Due To Climate Change Jeopardizes Native Alaskan’s Food Storage

Melting Permafrost Due To Climate Change Jeopardizes Native Alaskan’s Food Storage

For generations, Native Alaskans have stored their food year-round in icy cellars that have been dug deep underground, but recently many of these cellars are either becoming too warm so that the food spoils or failing completely due to flooding or collapse Civil Eats’ Kayla Frost reported from Alaska The cellars, known as siġluaqs, are usually about 10 to 20 feet below the surface and consist of a small room that used to be consistently about 10 degrees Fahrenheit year-round.

Why This Matters:  The loss of these natural freezers could be devastating to Native Alaskans.

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