One Climate SOS Thing: Floating A House Down the River Thames

The Extinction Rebellion launched another high profile protest, this time floating down the River Thames in London a “model” of a suburban home that is literally partially under water as a way to raise awareness about rising sea levels that will leave many homes under water.  The group said that, “[w]e are watching, in real-time, as people’s lives are destroyed around the world and in the UK. Unless action is taken to halt biodiversity loss and reduce greenhouse gas emissions to net-zero these tragedies are set to worsen.”  Berlin also saw a major climate protest on Sunday, as a group of activists many of whom were dressed as penguins called for a stop to all domestic and short-haul flights, arguing that they are disproportionately responsible for CO2 emissions and other gases blamed on global warming.  Got our attention! Mission accomplished.

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One Canceled Out Thing: 6500 Years of Cooling

One Canceled Out Thing: 6500 Years of Cooling

A new study shows that climate change in the 150 years since the industrial revolution has canceled out the prior 6500 years of cooling.  The study, conducted by researchers at Northern Arizona University’s School of Earth and Sustainability (SES), examined a new compilation of paleoclimate data along with new statistical analyses and found that millennial-scale […]

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Antarctica Warming 3X the Global Average

Antarctica Warming 3X the Global Average

There’s been ample research to show that the Arctic is warming much faster than any other region on the planet. However, there’s been little media focus on what’s happening on the opposite side of the planet, until now. A new study published in the journal Nature Climate Change on Monday has revealed that the South […]

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Climate Justice Coalition’s National Network Supports House Dems’ Climate Crisis Action Plan

A coalition of nearly 300 progressive groups that span the environmental and civil rights movements have been working together for a year to hammer out the pillars of a climate justice plan they want to see passed, and the House Climate Crisis Committee adopted much of it in the comprehensive Solving the Climate Crisis Action Plan released on Tuesday.

Why This Matters:  When they work together in a coalition, these groups have real political muscle.

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