One Cool Thing: 2000 Historical Wildlife Illustrations Now Available

(c) Wildlife Conservation Society

Forget digital photos – at least for a minute. The Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), one of the largest conservation organizations in the world, yesterday made available to the public a collection of more than 2,000 historical scientific wildlife illustrations from its Department of Tropical Research (DTR), which it ran from 1916 to 1965.  The collection is like a wildlife time capsule that was just opened.  The Society said, “These stunning illustrations include montages of otherworldly deepwater fishstately portraits of slothsstrange insectsbrightly colored birdssnakesfrogs, and other wildlife. Many of the illustrations seem almost whimsical, yet are scientifically accurate.”  You can enjoy the full collection here.

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