One Cool Thing: Humpback Whales Trapped in Alligator River Find Their Way Out

A trio of humpback whales was trapped for a few weeks well inland in an Australian river crawling with crocodiles — something never witnessed before, according to CNN.  The whales caused quite a stir — they were stranded in the murky East Alligator River in Kakadu National Park in Australia and could not find their way out.  Kakadu National Park is the largest terrestrial park in Australia and a UNESCO World Heritage Site.  The Park’s biologists believed the whales made their way into the river inadvertently during their annual migration. “As far as we’re aware, this is the first time this has happened,” it said in a statement last week.  Fortunately,  the whales made their way out on their own without any human assistance!

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