One Cool Thing: The First Electric Plane Flight

Photo: Jonathan Hayward, Canadian Press and AP

Forget biofuels for aviation.  A small Canadian airline, Harbour Air, made a huge leap forward earlier this month by making the first commercial airline flight powered by an electric engine.  It only remained in the air for a few minutes but that was long enough for the 63-year-old seaplane to claim this important first.  The pilot, who also owns the airline, said electric planes will make aviation cheaper, cleaner and quieter.   There are likely to be more “firsts” soon — Rolls-Royce has a plane it hopes will break a speed record for an electric aircraft during a flight planned for late spring 2020.

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California to Ban Sales of Gas Cars by 2035

California to Ban Sales of Gas Cars by 2035

Yesterday, California Governor Gavin Newsom announced that the state will phase out sales of all gasoline-powered vehicles by 2035. As Governor Newsom said in a separate event with Democratic governors yesterday, people have climate “goal fatigue” and are ready for the application of those goals–this move on gas-powered cars walks the walk on California’s ambitious […]

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One Great Headline: “Renewables to Quench Pepsi’s Thirst for Power”

One Great Headline: “Renewables to Quench Pepsi’s Thirst for Power”

H/T to renews.biz, an energy news platform, for that headline, and to PepsiCo for making it possible.  PepsiCo, one of the largest companies in the world — with a global carbon footprint — announced plans this week to transition to 100% renewable electricity across all of its company-owned and controlled operations globally by 2030 and […]

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A Methane Pandemic: Millions of Abandoned Wells Are Leaking into the Atmosphere

A Methane Pandemic: Millions of Abandoned Wells Are Leaking into the Atmosphere

As the candidates debate fracking, millions of abandoned natural gas wells are leaking literally tons of methane into the atmosphere, and there’s no fix in sight. There are an estimated 3.2 million abandoned oil and gas wells in the United States, and an estimated 29 million worldwide.

Why This Matters:  Methane leaks are dangerous — they have led to reports of tap water catching fire, toxic groundwater, and fatal explosions, all of which have been motivators for the federal government to track and seal these wells.

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