One Cool Thing: The Largest Solar Energy Project in the U.S.

Photo: Invenergy

Chicago-based Invenergy announced this week that it will construct at a site in northeastern Texas a $1.6 billion project that will provide 1,310-megawatts of solar energy by 2023.  The project is likely to create approximately 600 jobs during the construction, as well as bring in more than $250 million in landowner payments and $200 million in property taxes. It will produce enough energy to power approximately 300,000 homes. Customers include big-name companies like AT&T, Google, McDonald’s, and Honda helping each of them to meet their sustainability goals.  Deep in the heart of Texas, renewable energy emerges!

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Wind Power Blows Coal Away in Texas

Wind Power Blows Coal Away in Texas

Wind power has overtaken coal as a proportion of Texas’s power for the first time and promises to continue growing. In 2020, wind power made up almost a quarter of Texas’s total power, compared to just 18% from coal.

Why This Matters: Texas is the nation’s largest producer of both wind energy and fossil fuel energy.

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ANWR Oil Sale Was a Bust, Lower 48 a Different Story

ANWR Oil Sale Was a Bust, Lower 48 a Different Story

The sale of oil and gas drilling rights in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) was supposed to bring in upwards of $1 billion, but in the end, the first of the auctions mandated by Congress at the urging of President Trump brought in only $14M.

Why This Matters:  Banks won’t underwrite Arctic drilling, so it is unclear those ANWR leases will be drilled ever.

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Top Ten Stories of 2020: Oil and Gas’ Really Terribly Awful Bad Year

Top Ten Stories of 2020: Oil and Gas’ Really Terribly Awful Bad Year

When 2020 began, even with oil prices relatively strong, many industry analysts were predicting it was the beginning of the end for oil and gas.  And then the pandemic hit and the Saudis and Russians decided to take advantage of the downturn.  With supplies still high and demand declining, the industry may never be the same again.

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