One Cool Thing: Wildlife Comes Out At National Parks

A nursery group of bison cows and calves makes its way through Lamar Valley. Due to high rates of survival and reproduction, the bison population increases by 10 to 17% every year: ten times faster than the human population grows worldwide.

Bison at Yellowstone        Photo: Neal Herbert, National Park Service

Park Rangers at National Parks that have been closed for many weeks have observed things they had never seen before.  For example, pronghorn antelope in the sun-scorched lowlands of Death Valley National Park, and at Yosemite, with traffic a distant memory, deer, bobcats, and black bears have made their way into Yosemite Valley and are congregating in areas that used to be filled with tourists.  The few rangers that remained in Yosemite during the closures experienced an abundance of wildlife not seen in the last century, according to The Guardian. But wildlife experts are worried about the interactions between tourists and the wildlife once people return to the Parks this week. On Wednesday, a bison knocked a female visitor to the ground at Yellowstone National Park, the National Park Service said in a statement. So if you are going to a national park in the weeks ahead, be careful — wear a mask and watch out for wildlife!

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