One Cringeworthy Thing: Fossil Fuel Pals Running the Government

If you happened to read the New York Times’ exposé this week you would have caught that among 20 of the most powerful people in government environment jobs, most have ties to the fossil fuel industry or have fought against the regulations they now are supposed to enforce.

These are folks who have career-long connections to the industries they’re now tasked with regulating. Additionally, in all likelihood, they’ll return to these industries after they leave office.

The Times piece inspired our political cartoon this week…a cheat sheet of the top swamp creatures of the Trump EPA.

As always, go give our cartoonist Alex Bowman a follow on Twitter.

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