One Fall Thing: Enjoying the Colors Without a Car

 

Photo: Pat Wellenbach, AP

According to the American Automobile Association, most people prefer to see the fall colors by taking a road trip by car.  But as Mother Jones points out, there are lots of low-carbon alternatives.  For example, in New York City there are trains to the upstate New York trail that only take an hour and a half from Grand Central Station.  There are plenty of options in New York City too, which manages some 30,000 acres of public parks filled with historic sites and walkable and bike-friendly paths, as well as lot of trees — Central Park boasts 18,000 trees.  And out west, Amtrak’s California Zephyr from San Francisco to Denver cuts through Tahoe National Forest in Utah and several other parks in Colorado.   For more options and ideas on how to enjoy fall and keep your carbon footprint small, click here.

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