One Found Thing: The Wreck of the USS Nevada

The Wreck of the USS Nevada       Photo: Ocean Infinity/SEARCH, Inc. via The Washington Post

At the height of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, one Navy ship, the USS Nevada, tried to escape but did not make it out.  However, the ship was salvaged, repaired, and returned to service in World War II. It saw action on D-Day in 1944 off Normandy and the ship fought at the battles of Iwo Jima and Okinawa in the Pacific. At the end of WWII, it was painted orange and used for target practice for atomic bomb detonations, according to The Washington Post.  In 1948, the Navy purposely sank the radioactive ship in 15,000 feet of water in the Pacific, it’s whereabouts only roughly known.  In April, using special marine robots, two maritime search firms located the famous ship’s wreckage deep on the ocean floor. Fifty crewmen were killed and 109 wounded on the Nevada on December 7th. Just another reminder of who and what we honored on Memorial Day.

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First U.S. Offshore Wind Farm In Federal Waters Completed, Ready to Spin

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On Monday, the state of Virginia and Dominion Energy announced the completion of the second offshore wind facility in the U.S. and the first one in federal waters.  Its two turbines sit 27 miles off the coast and when operational later this summer, will produce enough electricity to power 3000 homes.

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One Working Remotely Thing: The Wonders of The Coral Sea Discovered

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Why This Matters:  Aside from the many discoveries, such as 10 new species of fish, snails and sponges, the entire expedition was conducted remotely because of the coronavirus pandemic — which apparently is a global first, but is unlikely the last time that will happen.

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Achieving Fully Protected Marine Reserves Is Increasingly Urgent

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