One Fun Thing: Birding on the Rise

COVID-19 has made us stop and notice the natural world we live in — and its been for the birds – literally!  The National Audubon Society has seen downloads of its bird identification app in March and April doubled over numbers since the same time period last year, and visits to its website are also up dramatically, according to E&E News.  Similarly, Cornell University has live bird cams and “visits” to that site have doubled, as well as public interactions with Cornell’s crowdsourced bird-logging app, eBird.  On Cornell’s site you can check out Barred Owls (and their adorable chicks), Red-Tailed Hawks (and their chicks), and Savannah Osprey, among others.  And you can take courses on bird identification, biology, and even their songs.  I (Monica) am hooked – can’t stop watching these beauties!  This one’s for you, Jessie G and David C!

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