One Future Thing: National Geographic Asks What Will Earth Day 2070 Look Like?

Art: Imaginary Forces for National Geographic

To mark the 50th Anniversary of Earth Day, National Geographic Magazine’s April issue asks the question “Where will we be 50 years from now” and looks at the answer from both the optimist’s and the pessimist’s perspective.  The result is a magazine that is equal parts of both — with one side titled “How We Saved the World” and the other “How We Lost the Planet.”  This is the first-ever “flip” issue in the Magazine’s history.  As Editor-in-Chief Susan Goldberg explains, “The stories in this issue reflect divergent realities. When I read about the young people taking charge of the environmental movement, I feel buoyed. Then I see Pete Muller’s photos of a scarred landscape we will never get back. What I do know is that it is our job to provide a factual framework for what is happening, documentary photography about what is forever changed and what we can save, and information to help empower all of us to make a difference.”  H/T to Nat Geo — we aspire to be as good at it as they are.

Up Next

Hero: Linda Zall Pioneered Climate Intelligence at the CIA

Hero: Linda Zall Pioneered Climate Intelligence at the CIA

Earlier this year, the NY Times’ Bill Broad shone a spotlight on the fine work of Linda Zall, who was a leader in using the CIA’s spy satellites to gather and analyze climate change data and intelligence for the government.

Continue Reading 222 words

Interview of the Week: Rt Hon. David Lammy

This past week, Our Daily Planet got a chance to sit down with the Right Honorable David Lammy, Member of Parliament for Tottenham, as well as the Shadow Secretary of State for Justice and Shadow Lord Chancellor in Keir Starmer’s Shadow Cabinet. We were inspired to talk to David after a recent TED Talk he […]

Continue Reading 272 words
Young Woman Leads Her Community In Baltimore To “Starve” Polluting Incinerator With Zero Waste

Young Woman Leads Her Community In Baltimore To “Starve” Polluting Incinerator With Zero Waste

The Wheelabrator waste-to-energy incinerator is Baltimore’s biggest standing source of air pollution. Its smokestacks send toxic mercury, lead, sulfur dioxide, and nitrogen oxides into the air off of I-95 in South Baltimore, whose residents are primarily Black and low-income. 

Why This Matters:  High polluting incinerators like the Wheelabrator facility are both harmful and expensive.

Continue Reading 571 words

Want the planet in your inbox?

Subscribe to the email that top lawmakers, renowned scientists, and thousands of concerned citizens turn to each morning for the latest environmental news and analysis.