One Hysterical Thing: Colbert’s Water-gate, Sharpie-gate, and Lightbulb-gate Monologue

Leave it to Stephen Colbert to perfectly cap off Our Daily Planet for the week.  His monologue from Wednesday night covers fertile ground for us — the “boob job” the President gave the storm track map to make it a “perfect 10” and the tweets about the poor NOAA spokesperson who was not allowed to answer press questions about the National Weather Service’s correction of the President’s misstatement about the storm track (see actual National Weather Service tweet that set off the President below).  And finally he gave the EPA light bulb efficiency rule rollback a light touch with the clip of the President’s statement on that — it was priceless.  It made me (Monica) laugh after I spent most of the last 36 hours feeling like this Administration and President had reached a new low. I was, however, also so proud of the fine public servants at the National Weather Service Birmingham Forecast Office that had the guts to correct the Commander In Chief.  So enjoy Colbert’s riff and we will be back on Monday.  And in the meantime, our thoughts are with the victims of Hurricane Dorian and our gratitude goes to all those who are helping them.

Why This Matters:  Here is what Monica told Don Lemon on CNN last night.

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