One Less Thing: China’s Air Pollution Thanks to Coronavirus Shutdowns

Image: NASA Earth Observatory

NASA released satellite images yesterday that make apparent the impact of the coronavirus on air pollution in China — and the good news is that the factory shutdowns made the air across the entire country of China — particularly over Wuhan — much cleaner.  NASA released a statement explaining that the maps above show concentrations of nitrogen dioxide, a noxious gas emitted by motor vehicles, power plants, and industrial facilities both before and after the quarantine went into effect.  “This is the first time I have seen such a dramatic drop-off over such a wide area for a specific event,” said Fei Liu, an air quality researcher at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center.  We wonder how you say silver lining in Chinese?

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