One Shrinking Thing: The Ozone Hole

Video: NASA

We know you weren’t losing sleep over this (unlike say the climate crisis), but there is a bit of good news this week.  NOAA and NASA announced that the ozone hole measured its smallest size ever for this time of year — typically when it is its largest.  The hole, which exists above Antarctica in the stratosphere between seven and 25 miles above the surface reached its peak on September 8th measuring 6.3 million square miles, then shrank to less than 3.9 million square miles during the rest of September and October — in a typical year the hole is around 8 million square miles in size.  Scientists attributed this good news to the reduction in the use of ozone-depleting chemicals called CFCs and to an unusual warming of the stratosphere this year.

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One Cool Thing: Mercury Transiting the Sun in 4K

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One Huge Thing: The Universe — How Big Is It?

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