One sweet thing: a tanker carrying molten chocolate crashes and spills

According to CNN a tanker hauling 40,000 pounds of liquid chocolate rolled over on the interstate near Flagstaff, Arizona, on Monday, leaving a river of the sweet liquid all over the road. The single-vehicle accident happened on Interstate 40, leaving some lanes blocked while crews attended to the chocolatey mess. No one was injured in the accident, but the clean-up did take about four hours and the liquid is biodegradable. Turns out chocolate rivers aren’t only for Willy Wonka.

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It’s Not So Simple: Debunking 5 Myths about Healthy and Sustainable Diets

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by Brent Loken, Global Lead Food Scientist, World Wildlife Fund There are few things more confusing than deciding which diet is best for people and planet. The internet is rife with hyperbolic headlines, oversimplified solutions, and heavily promoted remedies, all of which stoke division and squash good old common sense. Yes, eating in a healthy […]

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Climate and COVID Are Increasing Indigenous Food Insecurity

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At Subway, Eat Fresh What?

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