Read This: New York Times Visualizes Complex Ocean Currents Impacted by Climate Change

The New York Times has a must-see visualization of the problem that has climate scientists super-worried — the possible slowing down of the Gulf Stream, which would have a major impact on the weather of four continents.  It is thought that the Gulf Stream is as much as 15% weaker now than it was in 1950, and that will impact hurricanes and sea-level rise along the East Coast of the U.S. as well as alter the larger river of ocean water in the Atlantic Ocean known as the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation, or AMOC.  Another study released last week provided further evidence for this theory.

Why This Matters:  A 2019 report by the United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change concluded that although the AMOC will “very likely” weaken later this century, collapse is “very unlikely.” But, but, but there is still a chance that it will, and if it does, it would be a catastrophic “tipping point” that once reached, would create rapid, cascading effects globally.  The data so far is inconclusive but worrisome — a new wave of research into the deep ocean currents of the Atlantic is diving deeper.  The Times story beautifully illustrates how complex the system of currents is, and why we need to care about them. It’s definitely worth your time.

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