Read This: Typhoon Hagibis’ Path of Destruction in Japan

Trains in a Shinkansen bullet-train rail yard in Nagano, Japan, sit in floodwater due to heavy rains caused by Hagibis. Image: Reuters

Take a look at the Atlantic’s roundup of images from the aftermath of Typhoon Hagibis, the equivalent of a category 5 storm that struck Japan this past week, causing billions of dollars of wreckage in its wake and claiming 66 lives. Not only did the storm sweep away Fukushima nuclear waste bags into the river but it wrecked a fleet of bullet trains worth $300 million (as seen above).

Why This Matters: Japan is known for its sizeable investment in infrastructure to stave off natural disasters but the question being asked is do these preparedness measures stand a chance in the face of climate change which is intensifying storms like Hagibis?

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