Climate Change Is Causing a Stinking Mess in the South — Mold

Climate Change Is Causing a Stinking Mess in the South — Mold

The amount of rainfall and the number of severe storms that have hit the Southeastern U.S. are causing a lingering, stinking problem —  mold. The State’s Sammy Fretwell reports that researchers who studied the explosion of mold that occurred in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina 15 years ago now see the same thing happening throughout South Carolina after five years of excessive rain and numerous hurricanes.

Why This Matters:  Mold caused by one storm is awful, but when it is caused by repeated storms and lingering moisture under floors and in walls, there is no easy fix.

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COVID Pandemic Stalls NYC Resilience Funding Bill — Minorities Stand to Lose The Most

COVID Pandemic Stalls NYC Resilience Funding Bill — Minorities Stand to Lose The Most

Eight years ago Superstorm Sandy killed 44 people in New York City, cost the City approximately $19 billion in damages and lost economic activity according to city officials, and left more than 69,000 residences damaged.  Inside Climate News’ Kristoffer Tigue reported that earlier this year the New York state legislature was poised to pass a $3b bill called the “Restore Mother Nature Bond Act,” which would have allowed the state to issued bonds to help fund projects specifically geared toward reducing New York’s flood risk.  

Why This Matters:  Advocates argue that this delay in climate adaptation funding will hurt New York City’s low-income communities of color, which already bear a disproportionate burden of climate impacts.

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Venice Floods Again — What to Do When You Can’t Move to Higher Ground?

Venice Floods Again — What to Do When You Can’t Move to Higher Ground?

The historic city of Venice (a UNESCO world heritage site) flooded for the third time in a week, with Piazza St. Mark closed to tourists again on Sunday, and in Pisa and Florence torrential rains threaten to flood there too as the President of the region warned of a “flood wave” on the Arno that threads through both cities. 

Why This Matters:  Venice is a world treasure — it’s a city that floods with millions of tourists each year and is home to about 50,000 residents who depend on them. Its future is very much in doubt given the repeated and devastating floods — its residents are beginning to believe they are fighting a losing battle.

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Investigation By Associated Press Reveals More Than 1600 Risky Dams in the U.S.

Investigation By Associated Press Reveals More Than 1600 Risky Dams in the U.S.

The results of a two-year investigation by the Associated Press (AP) were published this week and the findings were shocking — nearly 1,700 dams located in 44 states and Puerto Rico were rated as “high-hazard” dams that are in poor or unsatisfactory condition.  Experts believe the actual number of risky dams is even higher — […]

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Small Businesses Hit Hard By Climate Change, Struggle To Recover

Small Businesses Hit Hard By Climate Change, Struggle To Recover

The Houston Chronicle published an eye-opening story about how extreme weather events are leaving many small businesses in ruins.  The paper reported that, according to the Federal Emergency Management Agency, nearly 40 percent of small businesses never reopen following a natural disaster, and another 25 percent fail within months.

Why This Matters:  Big companies can recover from extreme weather events, but small businesses with slim profit margins will struggle to stay afloat.  Red states along the Gulf of Mexico may be ground zero of this phenomenon, along with California.  Helping small businesses recover is another climate impact we will need to deal with in the years to come given the increase in the frequency of extreme weather events.  

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Rich Neighborhoods More Likely To Get Federal Flood Relief

Rich Neighborhoods More Likely To Get Federal Flood Relief

Homeowners in flood-prone wealthy areas have a much better chance of receiving a government buyout than more vulnerable rural areas with lower-income residents, according to a study published last week.

Why This Matters:  As climate change worsens, many areas in the U.S. have increasing exposure to its dangers.  And the study revealed that because “local officials must request federal funds for buyouts — and then successfully navigate a series of bureaucratic requirements.

 

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