More Extreme Weather Makes Life Harder for Millions of Americans This Week click button

More Extreme Weather Makes Life Harder for Millions of Americans This Week

The extreme weather events this summer keep piling up. Phoenix set a record for the most number of days over 110 degrees in a year with 35 — so far as of yesterday.  Plus a derecho, which is akin to an inland hurricane, swept 700 miles across the midwest Monday.

Why This Matters:  President Trump is trying to remove $50 billion from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to pay for needed unemployment benefits he unilaterally ordered.  Given the increased number of hurricanes predicted (a new storm is forming in the Atlantic), it seems like a particularly bad time to raid FEMA’s emergency funds.

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Heatwaves Will Be As Deadly As Diseases Globally — Should We Name Them To Raise Awareness?

Heatwaves Will Be As Deadly As Diseases Globally — Should We Name Them To Raise Awareness?

A new study published by the National Bureau of Economic Research found that if we don’t get global warming under control, the number of deaths globally from heat-related illness will rival the current number of deaths from all the infectious diseases combined.

Why This Matters:  Heat is considered a “silent killer” because there is little awareness about its health risks. To raise awareness many experts have recommended naming heat waves just like we do hurricanes and now winter storms.

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Despite COVID Worries, Climate Still A Top Concern For 66% of Americans

Despite COVID Worries, Climate Still A Top Concern For 66% of Americans

A new, nationwide public opinion survey conducted by Yale from April 7–17 found that a record-tying 73% of Americans think global warming is happening and only 10% deny it, but most believe it is happening to others and not to them. 

Why This Matters:  The pollsters expected they would find that because the public is so concerned about the pandemic that they would not have the ability to maintain their concern about climate change — a theory that social scientists call the “finite pool of worry.”  But that was not the case.

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April Ties Record, 2020 Could Be Warmest Year and CO2 Levels Highest in 3 Million Years

April Ties Record, 2020 Could Be Warmest Year and CO2 Levels Highest in 3 Million Years

April’s global average temperatures tied for the warmest on record, with NOAA predicting there is a 75% chance that this year will be the warmest since temperatures records began in 1880 due to much warmer than average temperatures in northern Asia, especially Siberia, across northern and coastal central Greenland, for parts of Antarctica, areas of Alaska and the Arctic Ocean. 

Why This Matters:  As carbon dioxide levels keep going up it is easier and easier to set warmest month records because it stays in the atmosphere for a long time continuing to heat us up.

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New Studies Point to More Extreme Heat and Storms in the U.S.

New Studies Point to More Extreme Heat and Storms in the U.S.

A study by The Earth Institute at Columbia University published last Friday in the Journal Science Advances found that the combined effect of extreme heat and humidity (known as the “wet bulb index”) is already exceeding in some locations for short durations of time the level that scientists thought would be the threshold of human survivability.

Why This Matters:  High heat and humidity combined is happening more frequently around the globe and has already resulted in massive death tolls due to climate change.

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One Very Hot Thing: The Weather in Australia

One Very Hot Thing: The Weather in Australia

As wildfires continued to rage in the New South Wales region, the average temperature in Australia reached its highest point ever at 40.9 degrees Celsius (105.6 F), according to the Australian Bureau of Meteorology that exceeded the previous record set in 2013 at 40.3 Celsius (104.5 F). Major cities in Australia such as Sydney and […]

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