#heat
Climate Extreme — Outdoor Air Conditioning Keeps Qatar Cool

Climate Extreme — Outdoor Air Conditioning Keeps Qatar Cool

Qatar is one of the hottest places on Earth and its temperature increases are accelerrating.  As a result, The Washington Post explains how Qatar does the unthinkable — air conditions its public outdoor spaces, fueling the “vicious cycle” of burning fossil fuels that lead to greater warming.

Why This Matters:  If the global average temperature rise exceeds 2 degrees Celsius, then Qatar’s average temperature will increase between 4 and 6 degrees, which would make work nearly impossible and the city could be uninhabitable.  Qatar may be able to cool certain areas for now, but it cannot cool the entire country indefinitely.

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Heat Wave Grips Europe – Again – High Temp Records Smashed

Heat Wave Grips Europe – Again – High Temp Records Smashed

It was nearly 109 degrees Fahrenheit in Paris yesterday according to Accuweather, breaking the previous all-time high-temperature record by more than 3 degrees.  The story was the same in Belgium, the Netherlands, and Germany, which all broke all-time records on Wednesday only to break them again on Thursday. 

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U.S. Soldiers and Minorities Unduly Impacted by Excessive Heat From Climate Change

U.S. Soldiers and Minorities Unduly Impacted by Excessive Heat From Climate Change

A new Defense Department report on the security impacts of climate change provides startling evidence of the impacts of climate change on military readiness and the welfare of servicemembers — Health impacts from heat have already cost the military as much as nearly $1 billion from 2008 to 2018 in lost work, retraining and medical care, according to a new report by NBC News and Inside Climate News.

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Most of U.S. Feeing the Heat; Dangerously Hot Days Are Increasing

Most of U.S. Feeing the Heat; Dangerously Hot Days Are Increasing

The National Weather Service warned that a “widespread and dangerous heat wave is building in the central and eastern U.S. this weekend – with more than a hundred fifty million people under heat watches and warnings, as the actual air temperature is forecast to reach at least 95 degrees for more than half the population of the continental U.S. through the weekend.

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AP: Record-Breaking Heat Twice As Likely As Record Cold

The Associated Press did a study and found that by the numbers, a record for heat was twice as likely to be broken as a record for cold temperatures in the U.S. between 1920 and 2018. They examined the data from 424 weather stations throughout the U.S. mainland for which they could examine temperature records. 

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Australia’s Sizzling Summer of 2019

Australia’s Sizzling Summer of 2019

This summer Australia shattered its heat records, with temperatures nationwide 3.8°F, above the 1961-90 average, according to Australia’s Bureau of Meteorology (BOM).  In a summary put out by the Bureau, they summed it up this way, “Mean and maximum temperature for the season broke previous records by large margins; both almost one degree above the record set in 2012–13.” 

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Southeastern Iran In the Grip of Climate Change Is a Dustbowl

Southeastern Iran In the Grip of Climate Change Is a Dustbowl

Heat, drought, and debilitating dust storms have, according to National Geographic, brought much of southeastern Iran to the brink of being uninhabitable.  The temperature in Sistan and Baluchestan province is often above 110 degrees F and it never rains, but the wind blows non-stop for 120 days straight each year. And so “the entire areas wanes under a months-long barrage of sand, cloying dust, and noise.” The entire area is in the grip of an unrelenting succession of environmental disasters that are a harbinger of what’s to come for many other parts of the planet.

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