A New Study Shows More Cities Globally Will Be Drowned By Sea Level Rise

A New Study Shows More Cities Globally Will Be Drowned By Sea Level Rise

New research using satellite positioning more accurately determines the elevation of numerous coastal cities — and as a result, previous estimates of the impacts of sea-level rise were far too optimistic and 150 million people are living in areas that will be below the high-tide line by 2050.  This assessment of the impacts on coastal cities is based on today’s population numbers, not counting future population growth or land lost to subsidence or coastal erosion so the actual numbers of people who will be displaced by sea-level rise globally will likely be even higher.

Why This Matters:  Too optimistic may be an understatement.  We must begin to adapt right now.  And physical barriers to sea-level rise can only go so far, particularly when they are based on “overly optimistic” estimates of how much and where the impacts of rising seas will be greatest.  

 

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Meeting the Challenge of Climate Change — One island, One Atoll, One Country at a Time

Meeting the Challenge of Climate Change — One island, One Atoll, One Country at a Time

By David W. Panuelo, President of the Federated States of Micronesia

This past week, world leaders gathered in Norway to focus on the health of our oceans at a critical time. For island nations such as the Federated States of Micronesia, threatened as never before by climate change, seriousness of purpose isn’t elective, it’s existential.

For me and for the country I am privileged to lead, the climate crisis is not abstract. It is not tomorrow’s far away challenge. We are just 1% dry land. Fly to Norway over the western Pacific and dotted below in the blue ocean are the more than 600 islands and islets that make up the Federated States of Micronesia.

For us, there is no climate and resilience plan without sustainable oceans at its heart.

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Our Ocean Conference Reels In 370 Ocean Stewardship Commitments Worth $63B

Our Ocean Conference Reels In 370 Ocean Stewardship Commitments Worth $63B

The Our Ocean Conference concluded in Norway with 370 separate pledges for action to conserve the ocean made by governments, NGOs and private corporations, with a value of $63 billion, ABC News reported Climate change commitments received the lion share of the funding at $51 billion, and the private sector providing nearly 80% of the funds.  Concurrently, a Youth Leadership Summit convened 100 young ocean activists from around the globe for a “boot camp” on ocean conservation innovative ideas.

Why This Matters:  The Our Ocean conference is a different type of global meeting — not based on a legal framework or executive agreement, and not limited to governments or as full participants — which seems to be one of the keys to its success.   The Conference also benefits from the exuberance of the youth meeting held in parallel.  It seems to be working — Palau has signed on to host the next year’s conference and Panama will host the year after that.

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Can Cities Build New Stadiums That Will Last 100 Years Given Climate Change?

Can Cities Build New Stadiums That Will Last 100 Years Given Climate Change?

A new stadium is a major economic boon and a huge financial commitment for the cities and sports teams that build them — and as a result, increasingly climate change impacts on these facilities are being taken into account in the building process.  The Washington Post reported last week that if sea levels were to rise 5 or 6 feet, numerous arenas and sports facilities in the United States would likely experience flooding including “TD Garden in Boston, Citi Field in New York, MetLife Stadium in New Jersey, Petco Park in San Diego, Del Mar Racetrack in California, and Oracle Park in San Francisco” with huge economic consequences.

Why This Matters: Because stadiums and arenas are so expensive and so iconic — think Fenway Park or Yankee Stadium — the builders have to confront today the question of climate impacts such as sea-level rise and extreme heat projected well into the future.

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Sea Level Rise in Florida Threatens Hundreds of Native American Sacred Sites

Sea Level Rise in Florida Threatens Hundreds of Native American Sacred Sites

The Florida Panhandle contains hundreds of archeological sites that reveal the lives and culture of the earliest Americans who used stone tools and hunted to subsist and represent a time period of over 2,000 years of occupation, but many of them are at grave risk due to sea-level rise due to climate change.

Why This Matters:  Native American sacred sites in the West are better known, but these sites are also important and not contained on federal land where they can be preserved and protected.  Once they are submerged, they will be gone for good.

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What’s the Matter with Florida?

What’s the Matter with Florida?

By Scott Nuzum Over the summer, I returned to my hometown of Venice, Florida for the first time in five years. As I prepared for my trip, I was excited by the prospect of revisiting old haunts, reconnecting with old friends, and reminiscing about my childhood spent exploring the area’s coastal waters. But I also […]

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