#wildlife
How Do New Diseases Like COVID-19 Originate In Wildlife Markets?

How Do New Diseases Like COVID-19 Originate In Wildlife Markets?

As Ferris Jabr explains in frightening detail in The New York Times Magazine, bats are “planets unto themselves, teeming with invisible ecosystems of fungi, bacteria, and viruses. Many of the viruses multiplying within the bats had circulated among their hosts for thousands of years, if not longer, using bat cells to replicate but rarely causing severe illness.”

Why This Matters: The hunter, by snatching the bats from their cave and selling them as food, he gave the viruses inside the bats a whole new world to inhabit in humans. 

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One Cool Thing: Wildlife Comes Out At National Parks

One Cool Thing: Wildlife Comes Out At National Parks

Park Rangers at National Parks that have been closed for many weeks have observed things they had never seen before.  For example, pronghorn antelope in the sun-scorched lowlands of Death Valley National Park, and at Yosemite, with traffic a distant memory, deer, bobcats, and black bears have made their way into Yosemite Valley and are […]

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Clamp Down on Cross-Border Trade Leads to Temporary Decline in Wildlife Trafficking

Clamp Down on Cross-Border Trade Leads to Temporary Decline in Wildlife Trafficking

In the silver linings category, the COVID-19 pandemic’s shock to economies around the globe is also proving to be a disruption to illegal wildlife trafficking by transnational criminal networks, according to a new report from Wildlife Justice Commission, a non-profit organization that investigates and tracks these criminal activities and networks. 

Why This Matters:  Temporary blockages in the black market supply chain are not surprising, and the bad guys will find a way around them — too much money is at stake and these folks are rule-breakers by training.

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One Bear Thing:  What We Can Learn From NH’s Most Famous “Mom”

One Bear Thing: What We Can Learn From NH’s Most Famous “Mom”

A writer for the Boston Globe, Bryan Marquard,  took this amazing photo after coming between a female black bear and her cubs recently.  She had just emerged from hibernation with a luxurious coat looking healthy. Mink is famous in New Hampshire because two years ago she was getting too close to local residents’ homes, so […]

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Coronavirus – How to Get Out of This Madness

Coronavirus – How to Get Out of This Madness

by Lee Hannah, Senior Scientist, Conservation International Right now, money is flowing from Capitol Hill to provide us with much needed economic support in response to the coronavirus pandemic. As this happens, we need to make sure that money also flows towards preventing similar pandemics from happening in the future. To stop this cycle of […]

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Happiness in the Age of COVID-19

Happiness in the Age of COVID-19

By Beth Allgood,  U.S. Country Director, IFAW In 2013, the United Nations (UN) marked March 20th as the International Day of Happiness to recognize the importance of happiness and well-being in the lives of people around the world. Last year, I attended the launch of the annual UN World Happiness Report in New York. This […]

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In Honor of World Wildlife Day, Empathy for Animals One and All

In Honor of World Wildlife Day, Empathy for Animals One and All

By Azzedine Downes, President and CEO of the International Fund for Animal Welfare As the leader of an organization dedicated to the wellbeing and conservation of animals, I often receive requests from the general public to intervene to help animals in need—from rescuing emaciated lions in makeshift zoos in Sudan, to helping multiple species of animals […]

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China Bans Wildlife Trade, Loopholes Remain

The rapidly-spreading coronavirus is thought to have originated in China’s Wuhan Huanan live animal market. As Grace Ge Gabriel, the Regional Director of Asia at the International Fund for Animal Welfare recently wrote in her Bright Ideas op-ed of the market, “The sign from the store with “wild tastes” in its name reads like a […]

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Western Voters, Nevadans In Particular, See Climate and Pollution As Top Issues In Election

Western Voters, Nevadans In Particular, See Climate and Pollution As Top Issues In Election

A new poll released Thursday by Colorado College just before the Nevada Democratic caucuses shows that for residents of both parties in Western states care deeply about a wide range of conservation issues from battling climate change and pollution, to protecting federal lands and parks and endangered species, and ensuring clean and plentiful water. 

Why This Matters:  If history is a guide, climate change will drive Latinos to vote in the caucuses and in the general election in Nevada this year.

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Will We Learn Our Lesson from the Coronavirus Epidemic?

Will We Learn Our Lesson from the Coronavirus Epidemic?

by Grace Ge Gabriel, Regional Director of Asia, International Fund for Animal Welfare   One billboard at Wuhan Huanan live animal market, where scientists believe the Coronavirus has originated, sends a shiver down my spine. The sign from the store with “wild tastes” in its name reads like a zoo’s exotic animal collection mixed with […]

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Some Dams Survive Through Inertia — Time to Take Them Down?

Some Dams Survive Through Inertia — Time to Take Them Down?

The removal of legacy dams, which were first constructed dozens to more than a hundred years ago, is proving to be increasingly popular to restore river flows now that they are no longer serving any purpose for generating power or driving industrial uses. 

Why This Matters:  There is no doubt that a free-flowing river is a healthy river.  As has been much discussed recently, the need to do everything we can to restore and conserve the natural world to stave off the next wave of extinctions and to combat climate change.

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How the West Was Lost

How the West Was Lost

By Kate Wall When one thinks of the western United States it’s hard not to conjure up images of wildlife and wilderness.  But a coalition of “western” lawmakers wants to change that.  Last week the Congressional Western Caucus formally announced a raft of legislation aimed squarely at the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The ESA has […]

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