Tesla’s Not So Unbreakable CyberTruck, GM Electric Trucks To Hit in 2021

On Friday, Tesla CEO Elon Musk “rolled out” the company’s much-anticipated entry into the electric pickup truck market, and it was eye-catching and unconventional, to say the least.  CNN Business reported that most of the assembled crowd could not believe their eyes when they saw the “Cybertruck,” describing it as “a large metal trapezoid on wheels, more like an art piece than a truck.”  Worse yet, the demonstration of the vehicle’s “unbreakable metal” glass windows did not exactly go as planned, when a metal ball thrown at the windows broke them, not once but twice.

Why This Matters:  This truck may be something that tech bros in Silicon Valley would buy.  But does it look like the kind of vehicle that will sell well in the heartland?  We are betting on GM and Ford to build electric trucks that will sell anywhere.

Ford and GM Will Also Sell Electric Trucks 

GM’s CEO Mary Barra said during an investor call last Thursday that by the fall of 2021 they will enter the market with an electric truck marketed toward the heart of the U.S. truck market.  According to CNN Business, Barra told investors “General Motors understands truck buyers.  And we also understand people who are new coming into the truck market that view it as a lifestyle vehicle.”  Ford is also driving toward electric trucks and the company released a video of their version towing a line of freight cars.  As we reported earlier this year, Ford has also invested in Rivian, a startup that will make manufacture electric pickup trucks that will have a range of up to 400 miles.
Musk’s Truck
Musk has made some big claims about his Cybertruck.  He says the top of the line version of the truck, the “Tri-Motor All-Wheel-Drive,” can carry a 3,500-pound load, and like a Porsche, go from zero to 60 in 2.9 seconds. It will also be able to drive up to 500 miles on a full charge at a cost of $69,900. But the base model, which will have a range of 250 miles, goes for a much more affordable $39,900.

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