We Talk Hot FERC Summer with Rep. Sean Casten

We sat down with Rep. Sean Casten (D-Ill.) to talk about the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) or “Hot FERC Summer,” as we like to call it. According to Rep. Casten, though FERC is often thought of as “a sleepy agency that is, frankly, kind of nerdy” — it can be a powerful force to fight climate change because it’s the only agency that sets the rules for US electric and gas markets.

 

During Hot FERC Summer, Rep. Casten introduced the Energy PRICE Act to balance the economic incentive for clean energy between consumers and energy producers and empower FERC to set carbon prices. But that’s not all FERC is working to change.

 

Watch our exclusive interview with Rep. Casten to hear about FERC’s plans for the nation’s electric grid and some expert perspectives on the Clean Electricity Performance Program (CEPP) as we head into COP26.

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