Climate change causing more far female sea turtles

Photo: National Geographic

Pollution, coastal development, toxic algae, and gillnets all pose a threat to the existence of sea turtles but climate change may pose the biggest threat of all. It turns out that the heat of the sand where eggs are buried ultimately determines whether a sea turtle becomes male or female. As NatGeo reported, since climate change is driving up temperatures around the world, researchers weren’t surprised that they’d been finding slightly more female offspring. In fact, in Raine Island, Australia—the biggest and most important green sea turtle nesting ground in the Pacific Oceans sand temperatures there had increased so much that female baby turtles now outnumber males 116 to 1.

NOAA researchers Camryn Allen and Michael Jensen have been studying turtles on Raine Island for quite some time yet this discovery was significant as older turtles that had emerged from their eggs 30 or 40 years earlier were also mostly female, but only by a 6 to 1 ratio. As NatGeo went on to explain, but younger turtles for at least the last 20 years had been more than 99 percent female. And as evidence that rising temperatures were responsible, female turtles from the cooler sands near Brisbane currently still only outnumber males 2 to 1.

However, after Allen and Jensen published their findings another research team studying loggerhead sea turtles in Florida published a paper revealing that temperature isn’t the only factor that affects sea turtle eggs and if sands are moist and cool, they produce more males. If sands are hot and dry, hatchlings are more female.

Why This Matters: Sea turtles have been around for 100 million years yet human influence may be causing their greatest challenge yet. It’s not totally clear how we can help turtles (aside from not dumping our waste in the ocean and causing climate change) with the disproportionate sex ratios of their hatchlings but researchers have found that providing shade for turtle nests to cool the sand has shown positive results. Protecting turtle habitat is crucial to preventing their extinction and that’s why the 30 by 30 campaign (a call for 30% of the planet to be managed for nature by 2030—and for half the planet to be protected by 2050) is so important for threatened and endangered species.

Up Next

North Atlantic Right Whale and Many Species of Lemurs Now Critically Endangered

North Atlantic Right Whale and Many Species of Lemurs Now Critically Endangered

The International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN), which is the global authority when it comes to whether a species is at risk of extinction, yesterday added the North Atlantic Right Whale of the eastern U.S. to its list of Critically Endangered species (elevated from Endangered) that are on the brink of extinction.  The IUCN also “upgraded” 13 different species of lemurs to the Critically Endangered list along with 20 other lemur species at risk of imminent extinction.

Why This Matters:  These species are on the verge of going extinct not because of anything they did, but rather because of us humans.

Continue Reading 561 words

One Turtle Thing: Tsunami Finds A Home In St. Louis

We just love a tsunami with a happy ending!  The Georgia Sea Turtle Center on St. Simons Island had been rehabilitating Tsunami, an endangered green sea turtle that was hit by a boat in 2017, for years with the hope of setting her free in the ocean.  But her injuries were too severe to survive […]

Continue Reading 174 words
Here’s How the US Government Can Help Prevent the Next Pandemic

Here’s How the US Government Can Help Prevent the Next Pandemic

By Will Gartshore, Director of Government Affairs and Advocacy, World Wildlife Fund (WWF) “Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.” It’s an old aphorism that still rings painfully true today. Long before Covid-19, the three deadliest pandemics in human history—the bubonic plague, Spanish influenza and HIV/AIDS—claimed more lives than all the […]

Continue Reading 963 words