Heroines of the Week: Two Long Time Ocean Champions

Dr. Nancy Knowlton

Sarah Chasis

In honor of World Oceans Day, this week we recognize a lifetime of hard work and dedication to ocean conservation by Dr. Nancy Knowlton of the National Museum of Natural History, and Sarah Chasis, the Senior Director for Oceans at the Natural Resources Defense Council. 

  • Dr. Knowlton, who received a Lifetime Achievement Award this week from the National Marine Sanctuary Foundation, has brought the ocean world to millions through her best-selling book Citizens of the Sea and as the former editor-in-chief of the Smithsonian’s Ocean Portal.  She coined the hashtag #OceanOptimism and its social media campaign connecting ocean conservation success stories to ocean lovers around the globe.
  • Sarah Chasis has been a tireless advocate for healthy and vibrant oceans for decades. She has protected sensitive areas from offshore oil drilling, protected the public from swimming in polluted waters, strengthened both domestic and international fisheries management, and promoted smarter ocean planning. In recognition of her work, she was selected as the first Coastal Steward of the Year by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

These two women have nearly 100 years combined of ocean advocacy and stewardship between them.  We can’t think of two people more deserving of our thanks for all they have done for healthy oceans.  

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