Japanese spacecraft lands on distant asteroid

Computer graphic of the Hayabusa2 spacecraft. Image: Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency

Last Friday, the Hayabusa2–a Japanese spacecraft–landed on a distant asteroid on a mission to collect material that could provide clues to the origin of the solar system and life on Earth. As AP reported Hayabusa2 extended a pipe and shot a pinball-like bullet into the asteroid to blow up material from beneath the surface. The craft then collected samples that will eventually be sent back to Earth. The attempt is the first of three such touchdowns planned.

As Fortune explained, actually landing on the asteroid, was no small feat and required incredibly precise calculations. The asteroid, named Ryugu after an undersea palace in a Japanese folktale, has a diameter of just 3,000 feet. And since it’s 170 million miles from Earth, it takes about 20 minutes for JAXA’s commands to reach the spacecraft. To make matters worse, the Hayabusa2 was only able to land on a circular area that’s just 20 feet in diameter. If it had landed anywhere to the sides of that circle, the mission would have failed. As Futurism explained, the collected samples will then return to Earth in a special return capsule at the end of next year.

As Space.com noted, Hayabusa2 isn’t the only asteroid-sampling mission going right now. NASA’s OSIRIS-REx spacecraft, whose goals are similar to those of Hayabusa2, has been orbiting the carbon-rich asteroid Bennu since Dec. 31. OSIRIS-REx is scheduled to grab Bennu bits in mid-2020 and return them to Earth in September 2023. Both probes are extending a trail blazed by the original Hayabusa mission, which arrived at the stony asteroid Itokawa in 2005. Hayabusa returned tiny pieces of that space rock to Earth in 2010. (The first Hayabusa aimed to get a larger sample, but its bullet did not fire as planned.)

Why This Matters: Ryugu is thought to be as old as our solar system itself and the samples collected by the Hayabusa2 could help scientists better understand its early history and evolution.

Go Deeper: There’s a lot happening in outer space, it’s been discovered that Neptune has a new moon!

 

 

 

 

Up Next

Scientists Test Solar Panel that Beams Power to Earth from Space

Scientists Test Solar Panel that Beams Power to Earth from Space

Pentagon scientists have successfully tested a small solar panel that, when launched into space, can collect solar power and beam it to any place on earth. The special panel is called a Photovoltaic Radiofrequency Antenna Module (PRAM) and was launched last May attached to a drone that circles the earth once every 90 minutes. If scaled up, scientists say that these orbital solar panels could work 24/7 and collect more sunlight than those on earth, and provide power to remote areas of the globe and major power grids alike.

Why This Matters: Along with hurricanes, tornadoes, wildfires, and other natural disasters, climate change will also be increasing power outages. This new technology could play a role in reducing power outages and creating a globally connected power grid.

Continue Reading 515 words
First All-Civilian Private Space Flight to Launch This Year

First All-Civilian Private Space Flight to Launch This Year

On Monday, SpaceX announced that it would launch the first all-civilian crew to space this year, with no training or assistance from NASA or another government agency.  Leading the four-person mission will be billionaire Jared Isaacman, an experienced pilot and CEO of e-commerce company Shift4.

Why this Matters: This publicity stunt is meant to suggest that the goal of space tourism — to bring ordinary citizens to outer space — is nearer than we think.

Continue Reading 434 words
As Private Companies Near Space Travel and Exploitation, New Legal Questions Arise

As Private Companies Near Space Travel and Exploitation, New Legal Questions Arise

To many companies, space is the new “Wild West,” a “final frontier”  of resources to be exploited for profit. To avoid a “land rush” in space, nations and space companies will need to agree on what they can claim to own or even begin to extract from outer space before their competitors beat them to it. 

Why this Matters:  Tesla and Amazon are working to make space travel and resource extraction for private citizens and companies possible.

Continue Reading 466 words

Want the planet in your inbox?

Subscribe to the email that top lawmakers, renowned scientists, and thousands of concerned citizens turn to each morning for the latest environmental news and analysis.