National Parks Picking Up

A car full of trash collected by volunteers at Joshua Tree National Park.  Photo: NPCA

With the shutdown over, for employees of our country’s National Parks, the tough clean up job is just getting started.  Sadly the toll of the shutdown on our natural heritage may have been greater than feared in some locations.  For example, Joshua Tree National Park suffered damage from vandalism that will be irreparable for the next 200 to 300 years, according to former park superintendent Curt Sauer.  The Trump Administration kept many parks open for most or all of the shutdown, but volunteers who helped clean up trash and service bathrooms in popular parks like Joshua Tree could not keep up with routine maintenance, much less stop the vandals.

“The damage done to our parks will be felt for weeks, months or even years. We want to thank and acknowledge the men and women who have devoted their careers to protecting our national parks and will be working hard to fix the damage and get programs and projects back up and running,” National Parks Conservation Association President Theresa Pierno said in a statement. “We implore lawmakers to use this time to come to a long-term funding agreement and avoid another disaster like this. Federal employees, businesses, communities, and national parks deserve better.”

Why This Matters:  At parks like Muir Woods in California, visitor traffic was slow when the park re-opened.  it will take some time, and lots of help from volunteers, to clean up the mess the unnecessary shutdown created.  Or even years for the damage to precious natural resources to heal.  What a shame.  The National Park Service lost an estimated $400,000 per day in entrance fees — $14 million in total during the shutdown, according to Think Progress.  According to the NCPA, “This revenue loss disproportionately harms some of the largest and most popular parks in the park system, such as the Grand Canyon, Shenandoah, Yellowstone, Yosemite and Zion, because these parks keep 80 percent of their entrance fees on site and depend on this revenue for their operating budgets.”  Not to mention the costs to nearby communities of lost tourism dollars they can never get back.  SAD.

What You Can Do:  Join a park clean up!  Volunteer here.

Up Next

UK’s Post-Brexit Farm Subsidies Will Prioritize Carbon Sequestration

UK’s Post-Brexit Farm Subsidies Will Prioritize Carbon Sequestration

Throughout Brexit, many have wondered about the environmental implications of the UK leaving the European Union. When the split becomes official at the end of the month it will also mean a severing with Europe’s notorious farm subsidies. As Science Mag reported, many researchers see this as a good thing as this week “the U.K. […]

Continue Reading 590 words
Australia’s Wildfire Hell Continues

Australia’s Wildfire Hell Continues

To say that Australia’s massive wildfires have been unprecedented is an understatement. The world has watched in disbelief at images of people and animals fleeing for their lives as more than 200 fires have burned roughly 12 million acres. As CBS News reported, the fires have forced more than 100,000 residents and tourists to flee […]

Continue Reading 416 words
Interview of the Week: Emily Ellison

Interview of the Week: Emily Ellison

Emily is the Executive Director of the St. Simons Land Trust on Georgia’s famed St. Simons Island. ODP: We’ve talked before about why land trusts are an important part of conservation. What is something that SSLT has accomplished this year that exceeded all of your expectations?  EE: This year, the St. Simons Land Trust celebrated […]

Continue Reading 598 words