One Cool Thing: Deep Sea Exploration You Can Watch LIVE!

Giant blue clams at Kingman Reef        Photo: NOAA

There is far too little exploration of the wonders of the deep sea, but there is one very high profile expedition going on now and you can watch it live!  Dr. Robert Ballard, the National Geographic Explorer in Residence who discovered the Titanic, and his Exploration Vehicle (E/V) Nautilus, is currently exploring for the first time the National Marine Sanctuary of American Samoa (NMSAS) to acquire baseline information on deep-sea and mesophotic habitat.  You can see what they are finding in real-time (though it is halfway around the world), just click here.  They recently completed their exploration of Kingman Reef, Palmyra Atoll, and Jarvis Island within the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument. And what’s ahead is even more exciting — Tuesday National Geographic announced that they are teaming up with Dr. Ballard and the E/V Nautilus on an expedition later this year to find Emelia Earhart.

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