One Cool Thing: Florida Divers Set World Record for Ocean Clean Up

It’s an official Guinness Record        Photo: Mike Stocker, Sun-Sentinel

A group of 633 scuba divers near Boca Raton, Florida set a new Guinness Book of World Records world record for the largest underwater cleanup in the world.  Ahmed Gabr, a former Egyptian Army scuba diver, with a team of 614 divers in the Red Sea in Egypt in 2015, held the record previously.  While they don’t know how much trash was recovered, they were able to give the area surrounding a popular pier a thorough clean up. Diver and environmentalist RJ Harper, who helped recruit divers for the event, reported that the divers recovered 1,600 pounds of lead fishing weights alone, the result of years of anglers cutting bait, according to the South Florida Sun-Sentinel.  Harper says he hopes this event will inspire other communities to do the same.  We hope so too!

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One Blue Thing:  More Flower Garden In the Gulf of Mexico

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One of our nation’s best-kept secrets is that we have national parks in the ocean — not right offshore — but out in the blue.  And yesterday, one of them was tripled in size after years of work by non-profits, the Texas and Tennessee Aquariums, and the National Marine Sanctuary Foundation, that supports these blue […]

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New Offshore Wind Facility Approved By New York

New Offshore Wind Facility Approved By New York

New York state selected Norwegian energy giant Equinor to build and supply clean energy from two offshore wind facilities in one of the largest renewable energy deals ever in the United States, according to Reuters.

Why This Matters:  Offshore wind projects are a highly anticipated source of clean, renewable energy — but have been hard to get off the ground so far.

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Building Back Better From Coast To Coast

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