One Cool Thing: Going to the Moons

You don’t have to be an astronaut to go to the moon!  National Geographic has created a really cool interactive Atlas of the Moons — ALL of the moons in our solar system.  Earth is the only planet in our solar system with just one moon — and you can learn much more about it in the Atlas, including seeing where the historic landing happened 50 years ago. But don’t stop there!  There are almost 200 moons in our solar system and they have mysteries and wonders to explore!  So without even leaving your laptop, you too can be a space explorer!  As we celebrate the anniversary of the first landing on the moon, we hope that it inspires a whole new generation of Americans to cherish the Earth and to dream big and believe that there is nothing we cannot do if we put our minds to it.   

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NASA Earth Science to “Meet the Moment”

NASA Earth Science to “Meet the Moment”

This op/ed was originally featured in SpaceNews on March 30th and has been reprinted with their and the author’s permission.  By Nancy Colleton Small businesses and large multinational corporations face incredible challenges and uncertainty in today’s world. Whether an uncertain economy, continuing impact of a pandemic, or the rapidly changing natural environment of water scarcity, ecosystem […]

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Experts Are Uncovering Mars’ Secrets, but Humans Could Be the Next Life Found on Mars

Experts Are Uncovering Mars’ Secrets, but Humans Could Be the Next Life Found on Mars

Experts are finally uncovering the secrets of Mars; new spacecraft, research, and data are helping NASA and other space agencies fill in gaps in knowledge about the potential for life on the red planet. 

Why This Matters: For decades, scientists have explored the idea of placing humans on Mars for research not only on the planet itself but on its potential to sustain human life.

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NASA Names 27 Asteroids After Black, Hispanic, and Native American Astronauts

NASA has named 27 asteroids in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter after Black, Hispanic, and Native American astronauts to recognize their contributions and inspire a new generation of potential space explorers. Among those honored include Stephanie Wilson, Joan Higginbotham, Ed Dwight Jr., José Hernández, and John Herrington.  

Why this Matters:  NASA, like many American industries, has struggled with diversity — only 18 Black astronauts have gone to space.

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