One Credit Thing: A Card With a Carbon Spending Limit

A Swedish-based think tank is launching a new credit card in collaboration with the UN Climate Change Secretariat and Mastercard that will give individuals a means to lower their carbon footprint the hard way.  The credit card will cut off your spending — actually disapprove a transaction — because you have reached your carbon limit for the year.  According to Fast Company, each person’s limit is based on a country-specific calculation of how much carbon an individual can “emit” and still stay on track with the 2030 goal to cut emissions in half. Mathias Wikström, one of the co-founders, said of the inspiration for the card, “I mean, people will react to it like, ‘Oh, so you want me to stop spending?’ No, not necessarily. I want you to start understanding.”  Talk about putting your money where your mouth is.

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Now That We Are Starting To Do It, Can We Get Adaptation Right?

Now That We Are Starting To Do It, Can We Get Adaptation Right?

A new study in the Journal of Ocean & Coastal Management concludes that decisions regarding which adaptation projects to put in place are not being made on the basis of what is most efficient and effective in the long run and that the poorest citizens are bearing the brunt of these mistakes, Bloomberg reports

Why This Matters:  Beach replenishment is preferable over hardening coastlines to protect them from the climate impacts we are already experiencing, but sometimes buyouts will be more cost-effective than repeatedly replenishing.   Doing adaptation the right way may be more expensive and may require difficult choices about how to be fair, and not simply undertake projects that disproportionately benefit the wealthy landowners and increase the vulnerability of poor and historically marginalized communities.

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Prada Becomes First Luxury Brand to Receive a Sustainability-linked Loan

Prada Becomes First Luxury Brand to Receive a Sustainability-linked Loan

The Prada fashion group has become the first luxury brand to sign a sustainability-linked loan. This type of loan (amounting to $55 million for Prada) links annual interest rates to practices that help the environment.

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A Word About Your Halloween Candy….

A Word About Your Halloween Candy….

The Washington Post has written two pieces this year that examined the two biggest issues plaguing the chocolate industry: child labor and deforestation.

Chocolate companies have made and failed to meet commitments to both. 

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