#Greenland

Greenland Ice Melt Is A Huge Story

In early August, Greenland lost between12 and 24 billion tons of ice each day, which, The Washington Post reported was about 6 to 18 billion tons greater than the typical rates seen during the same dates during the time period from 1981-2010.  According to The Post, the melt season overall — which has about 35 to 40 days to go — is poised to set a new and more significant record, the 2012 record ice loss, which reached 300 billion tons of surface ice mass loss from Greenland.

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Arctic Melting Increasing, As Are Costs Of Dealing With It

Arctic Melting Increasing, As Are Costs Of Dealing With It

A team of scientists studying Greenland’s ice mass reviewed data going back as far as 1972 for the first time, which allowed them to look at longer trends, and learned that even though there might be more snow in some years, the glaciers (large ice masses on the land) are still being negatively impacted by warming, according to a new study published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Interview of the Week: Jon White, CEO and President, Consortium for Ocean Leadership

Interview of the Week: Jon White, CEO and President, Consortium for Ocean Leadership

Jon White had a 32-year career in the Navy, rising to its chief meteorologist and oceanographer before his 2016 appointment to lead the Consortium.  We asked him about the impact of ocean warming on our planet’s climate.

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Greenland’s Rapid Ice Melt Could Jeopardize Major Cities

Greenland’s Rapid Ice Melt Could Jeopardize Major Cities

Sea level rise caused by rapidly melting ice sheets in Greenland is now even more likely to adversely impact the most vulnerable coastal cities: Shanghai, Hong Kong, Osaka (Japan), Rio de Janeiro, and Miami, according to a news report in The Guardian.  A new study published by the National Academies of Sciences led by scientists from Ohio State found that ice loss between 2003 and 2013 was greater than previously thought because in addition to glaciers, a greater amount of melting during that time came from ice sheets in the southwest region of the island, which is largely glacier-free and had not been as closely studied in the past. 

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