Wisconsin Joins Climate Alliance

Wisconsin Governor Tony Evers     Photo: Steve Apps, State Journal

Wisconsin’s new Governor Tony Evers announced on Tuesday that the state would become the 21st to join the U.S. Climate Alliance and meet the climate change reduction targets set by the Paris Agreement.  By adding Wisconsin, the states that have joined the Alliance represent nearly half the U.S. population and combined have economies worth over $10 trillion.  By joining the Alliance, the members agree to:

  • Implement policies that advance the goals of the Paris Agreement, aiming to reduce greenhouse gas emission by at least 26-28 percent below 2005 levels by 2025,
  • Track and report progress to the global community in appropriate settings, including when the world convenes to take stock of the Paris Agreement, and
  • Accelerate new and existing policies to reduce carbon pollution and promote clean energy deployment at the state and federal level.

In a statement, the Governor said, “It’s a new day in Wisconsin and it’s time to lead our state in a new direction where we embrace science, where we discuss the very real implications of climate change, where we work to find solutions, and where we invest in renewable energy. By joining the U.S. Climate Alliance, we will have support in demonstrating that we can take climate action while growing our economy at the same time.”

  • The climate and clean energy policies of the Climate Alliance states have created 1.6 million renewable energy and energy efficiency jobs, equivalent to over half of all clean energy jobs in the United States.
  • Policies on climate and clean energy in Alliance states now control 35 percent of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions.

Wisconsin’s Lt. Governor also promised to explore energy efficiency and savings goals, and to focus on “better understanding how climate change is disproportionately affecting communities of color and how it’s impacting our farmers and the most rural parts of our state.”

Why This Matters:  Wisconsin joins its neighbor Michigan in reversing the policies of its former Republican Governor and is making a real commitment to combat climate change.  This is another key state in the 2020 election, and demonstrating that fighting climate change is not a drag on the economy but instead will create jobs will be important to both the state, and likely in the Presidential campaign.  Wisconsin could prove to be decisive again in the next election just as it was in 2016.  

Up Next

A Few House Republicans Hold a Climate Change Confab

“You can’t find a Utahn who doesn’t really care about clean air and clean water.” @RepJohnCurtis said his goal is to find ways “to make them feel more comfortable [politically] talking about it.” @LeeDavi49903322 #climate https://t.co/jVpPBJq0GE — CCL Salt Lake City (@CCLsaltlake) February 19, 2021 By Natasha Lasky, ODP Staff Writer Representative John Curtis of […]

Continue Reading 472 words
U.N. Security Council Focuses Climate Risks

U.N. Security Council Focuses Climate Risks

Climate change is the biggest threat facing the world, and yesterday’s United Nations Security Council meeting was focused on the topic. United States climate envoy John Kerry, who participated in the virtual meeting, warned that ignoring the crisis and its threats to global security would mean “marching forward to what is almost tantamount to a mutual suicide pact.” 

Why this Matters: Global food security, poverty rates, and public health are all negatively impacted by climate change. These destabilizing forces are already driving people to migrate and shifting power balances on the international stage.

Continue Reading 518 words
The U.S. Officially Rejoins Paris Agreement

The U.S. Officially Rejoins Paris Agreement

On Friday, the U.S. officially rejoined the Paris Agreement on climate change. Just under one month into his term, President Biden has officially reversed one major element of Trump’s intended legacy, and climate officials across the globe are welcoming our nation back with open arms. 

Why This Matters: The last four years proved to be a disaster for the climate.

Continue Reading 559 words

Want the planet in your inbox?

Subscribe to the email that top lawmakers, renowned scientists, and thousands of concerned citizens turn to each morning for the latest environmental news and analysis.